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Muehlenbeckia complexa

Family: Polygonaceae

Common names: MAIDENHAIR VINE, MATTRESS VINE, NECKLACE VINE, WIRE VINE

Native to: New Zealand

Plant

Type: vine

Forms: pendent, spreading

Leaves deciduous

Leaves evergreen

Max height: 0.00 feet

Max width: 16.4 feet

Flower

white/off white, yellow

Leaf

green

Horticulture

Attracts wildlife: adult butterfly, specific butterfly species

Plant features: climbing vine, deciduous, evergreen, weedy

Exposure: light shade, sun

Landscape uses: container, ground cover, screen

Weedy

Propagates by: seed

flowers in summer

Soil type: well drained

USDA Zones: zone 8 to +10 f, zone 9 to +20 f, zone 10 to +30 f

Temp. range: +10 to +40 °F

Water: regular

Butterflies that feed on this plant

  • Muehlenbeckia complexa 2 2
  • Muehlenbeckia complexa 2
  • Muehlenbeckia complexa 3
  • Muehlenbeckia complexa 4

Container plants that attract adult butterflies - vine

This plant is one of 25 vines suitable to grow in a container that can attract adult butterflies. 3 of these plants attract birds and 9 attract specific butterfly species. They can be found in large, medium-large and tiny heights - from less than a foot long to over 10 feet tall. None of these plants are drought tolerant as most of them prefer moderate or regular watering. 7 are deciduous, while 19 are evergreen. Some can grow in Zones 3 and Zone 4, while the others grow in Zones 5-11. 23 vines that attract butterflies and can be grown in containers in Zone 9. None are known to be used as cut flowers. They are available in seven different flower colors.

We encourage you to use additional filters to refine your plant search for butterfly-friendly plants. Most vines grown in containers will need support that enables the vine to climb or twine around the support. Inserting a trellis in the container can work.

There are 221 vines in this database of which this short list of 25 vines can attract adult butterflies and be grown in a container. Most vines are prostrate, so we set their height to "0" while registering the plant's potential length in the width category. The length of many vines can be controlled by human activity.